No Doctor Needed

nelson

The former German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt once said, People who have visions should go and see a doctor. I disagree.

We’ll send a man to the moon by the end of the decade.

We’ll end racial segregation in this country.

We’ll unite this country through rugby.

Great leaders, great transformational leaders, game changers share their vision. But it doesn’t have to . . . → Read More: No Doctor Needed

Have You Ever Been On Morphine?

morphine

Your first sentence is my biggest fetish in public speaking. As a public speaker and trainer I’m fanatical about your first sentence. To capture 100% of the audience attention in the first couple of seconds – that is true art.

One of the five patterns for the first sentence I teach and use the most, I call . . . → Read More: Have You Ever Been On Morphine?

Do It Like Aristotle

threepillarsofpersuasion

One of the most influential books for public speakers is Aristotle’s Rhetoric. In this classic, Aristotle describes the three modes of persuasion. The three modes of persuasion are devices in rhetoric that classify the speaker’s appeal to the audience. They are: logos, ethos, and pathos. For visual reasons I like to refer to them as the three pillars of . . . → Read More: Do It Like Aristotle

A Blast Of Learning, Insights And Inspiration

happy

It was, of course, another blast! A blast of learning, insights and inspiration – our Toastmasters District 59 (South Western Europe) Fall Conference in Lyon, France from 21-23 November 2014.

The motto of the three-day conference was “Happy in Lyon” and, yes, happy we were! In the past, I’ve repeated myself so many times that not even . . . → Read More: A Blast Of Learning, Insights And Inspiration

Kill Your Meta Speech

BauhausType

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, God of Bauhaus, once said, Less is more. Less is more is not only a golden rule for architecture à la Bauhaus. Less is more is also a golden rule for public speakers. The less you say, the better your speech.

One of the most important speeches of modern times has 273 words . . . → Read More: Kill Your Meta Speech